Teen Parade 2019
Making mistakes to know who we are
04-03-2020 • • di Carlotta F
Hey guys! We really had an epic week. Between the 12th and the 14th of November Radioimmaginaria has been in Genova (Italy) at Orientamenti. There we brought Teen Parade, the festival of the world of work explained by teenagers. Not only us, but the Case cubes, a lot of guests and most importantly our Stranger Room as well! No one knows what happens in there, but those who entered without a clue about the future, magically came out with clearer ideas...

Since we want to solve some stuff once and for all, we invented Dibattib-eco. No, it's not a prehistoric bird, it does not bite and it does not change color if exposed to the sun. The rules are simple: you have a really difficult topic, a bunch of ignorant teenagers (us) and some guests with wonderful stories to tell who are ready to help us. The goal was to clear our heads about different topics. Here's what we've learnt. More or less...
14 NOVEMBER - Making mistakes to know who we are -

Everyone of us would like to have the job of their dreams, but to actually do that is a real challenge. You know how after you've failed your exam your teacher just tells you that you'll learn by making mistakes? NO IT DOESN'T WORK LIKE THAT! How can I learn if I keep making mistakes? We talked about this with: Marco De Rossi, founder of WeSchool (digital school platform used by 2 millions students and 90.000 teachers), Nanna's Garage, a 23 years old girl who fixes Fiat 500s for a living, Matia Pangallo, founder of Fridays for Future Sanremo and Eleonora Giorgi, the "lettrice geniale" who transformed her passion for reading in a job.
From what our guests told us we understood that we can do anything! We can even fail P.E.! Making mistakes and realising you did is fundamental when it comes to making your dreams come true. And this is very important in school too! But is school supposed to display all the possibilities we have or are we supposed to do that for ourselves by looking for different experiences outside of school? Are we the ones who will invent the job of the future?
And that's exactly the point of Teen Parade: finding out who we want to be before of what we want to do. In the end the most important thing is to do what we like and what looks like our path.
There's no exact science to find the job we're more suitable for, and that's why it's normal to be confused at age 14. But when we get something wrong we don't have to tear ourselves down because it's precisely through mistakes that we learn what is right to do.